Sunday, 17 December 2017

2018: Year of the Shed




So, here is the news.  After making a few cheeky enquiries, I have the assurance that my allotment, originally given to me on a six month "trial" basis, is now mine.  I can pay my £50 annual fee in the new year, at which point I become a fully fledged, official allotmentier.  This makes me HAPPY, and I hope it makes you happy too.

The possibilities!  Sarah, my incorrigible friend and fellow plant enthusiast, and I have already met to talk about seeds and make various plans for the future, as alluded to in a previous post.  Now that this is all "official" though (or as official as it can be, allotment people are a very laid back lot) my imagination is really starting to run wild.

Let's talk about the shed.  A humble, and deceptively simple artefact is the garden shed but even a little digging about online reveals a rich subculture of enthusiasts and an enticing niche history of its own.  Here is George Bernard Shaw modelling his very own "rotating writer's shed", which sat on a turntable so that he could rotate it through the day to keep facing the sun (image courtesy of Apartment Therapy).


Other literary figures with a fondness for sheds include Roald Dahl (nicknamed "mouldy" by his family for this very reason) as well as Dylan Thomas, Virginia Woolf and other dignitaries.

Here is the shed that currently sits on my allotment, outside:

Pathetic.

and in:

Mouldy.
It's barely worthy of the term "shed" if you ask me.  For starters, it's made of plastic and I think we can all agree that all sheds must of necessity be made of wood.  What's more, it's full of holes, only one of which was ever a window; the other is a door (frame, with no actual door) the other is just...a hole.  This is no good.  It'll have to go.  So the question becomes, what to replace it with?  And here the adventure begins.







 Subscribe to RSS

Related posts

2018: Year of the Shed (Part Two)
Hibernation and Allotment Planning
Get on My Land
My Allotment: the first two months
Allotment Update (and some brief morning whimsy)


******

Please consider disabling your adblockers when reading this site.  I make every effort to ensure no inappropriate, rubbish or offensive advertising appears here, and nothing that is contrary to the spirit of this blog.  So it's really nothing to be afraid of.  Cheers.

Saturday, 2 December 2017

Marvellous Mistakes




These are, according to the supermarket, "marvellous misshapes".  I beg to differ.  While nobody could be more in favour than I am of any initiative to present food realistically and - dare I say it - naturally, and in the interests of reducing waste, I'm not convinced that these decidedly uniform potatoes really qualify as misshapen.  I'm inclined to wonder whether this might be just another example of consumerism commodifying a genuine concern.  It would not surprise me in the least.



Oh well, never mind.


Topping up the wormery this morning I come across this curiosity; a potato I've left to chit over winter, experimentally, hoping perhaps to be able to plant it in the early spring.  


Left entirely to its own devices, and the little blighter's making a jolly good go of things.  Let's take a closer look



The mysterious and perhaps even sacred beauty of life is here, bursting from a shrivelled potato, the likes of which inspires me to use adjectives I'm not sure really exist.  The word "spangly" forms on my lips.  A spangly potato.  Those shoots, with - can you see - embryonic new potatoes forming on them?  I can't even find a sound that describes them.  I gaze, idly enough, in silence and wonder.






This is just what life does, without us.  

And, a whole world away, in many senses, supermarkets.





 Subscribe to RSS

Related posts

Celebrating Roast Potatoes
Indoor Potato Harvest #1
Failure, hope and potatoes
A Potato's Progress
******

Please consider disabling your adblockers when reading this site.  I make every effort to ensure no inappropriate, rubbish or offensive advertising appears here, and nothing that is contrary to the spirit of this blog.  So it's really nothing to be afraid of.  Cheers.